Thomas Earnshaw’s troublesome chronometer

As Ships, Clocks & Stars makes its way round the world, there’s still time to look at the stories behind some of the objects in the exhibition. If you go see it now at the Folger Shakespeare Library, one of the objects you may come across is chronometer number 512,…

Need a longitude fix? We’ve got you covered

Last month we said a tearful goodbye to Ships, Clocks & Stars, which has been a large part of our lives for the past six months. The good news is that the closing of the exhibition does not mean the end of the longitude story here at Greenwich. Indeed the…

Longitude Legends: James Cook

This week’s longitude legend is Captain James Cook, who features in not just one but two exhibitions currently on at Royal Museums Greenwich. The Art & Science of Exploration, 1768-1780 in The Queen’s House displays the exceptional paintings, prints and drawings by specially commissioned artists on Captain Cook’s 18th-century voyages…

Time to Solve Longitude: The timekeeper method

The simplest solution to the problem of longitude was one of time difference. You can determine how far east or west you are of a given location if you know the difference between local time (determined by the sun) and time in that location. All you need is a clock…