Category Archives : Maritime history

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The Death of Captain Cook – Voyage of the Damned

 Going to sea is a dangerous business. Ahead of our Halloween event Voyage of the Damned, we’re looking at some of the more gruesome tales that can be found in our archive.  Today we look at what happened to the famous explorer Captain Cook.  Captain James Cook was no stranger to near…

London and the slave trade, International Slavery Remembrance Day

London and the transatlantic slave trade Between 1662 and 1807 British and British colonial ships purchased an estimated 3,415,500 Africans. Of this number, 2,964,800 survived the ‘middle passage’ and were sold into slavery in the Americas. The transatlantic slave trade was the largest forced migration in human history and completely changed Africa,…

Historising Slavery

Ahead of International Slavery Remembrance Day, Kristy Warren shares her experiences engaging young people with the history of slavery.  As part of my role on the UCL (University College London) based Legacies of British Slave-ownership (LBS) project, I am involved in sharing our work with diverse audiences. This involves reflecting on…

Ways of Seeing – Conference Response

Today’s guest post is by Damian Smith of RMIT University in Melbourne. He summarises and responds to  the fascinating series of papers at our ‘Ways of Seeing‘ conference. It was linked to our contemporary art exhibition Unseen: The Lives of Looking by Dryden Goodwin. The 2015 Ways of Seeing Conference, held on…

Models of Remembrance

Now we’re in the centenary of the First World War, and with the recent anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, it emphasised how much of a role physical objects play in constructing our interpretation of events now lost to living memory. Not just in an historical factual sense, but in…